J Wolfgang Goerlich's thoughts on Information Security
Friday Books and Talks 05/30/2014

By wolfgang. 30 May 2014 16:51

Change the Culture, Change the Game
by Roger Connors, Tom Smith

Roger Connors and Tom Smith show how leaders can achieve record-breaking results by quickly and effectively shaping their organizational culture to capitalize on their greatest asset-their people. Change the Culture, Change the Game joins their classic book, The Oz Principle, and their recent bestseller, How Did That Happen?, to complete the most comprehensive series ever written on workplace accountability. Based on an earlier book, Journey to the Emerald City, this fully revised installment captures what the authors have learned while working with the hundreds of thousands of people on using organizational culture as a strategic advantage.

Open Leadership
by Charlene Li

"Be Open, Be Transparent, Be Authentic" are the current leadership mantras-but companies often push back. Business is premised on the concept of control and yet the new world order demands openness-leaders do not know how to be open and be in control. This must-have resource will help the modern leader understand how to lead in the new open world-where blogging, twittering, facebooking, and digging are becoming the norm. the author lays out the steps that leaders must take to transform their organizations and themselves into being "open" -and exactly what that will mean.

 

Color blind or color brave?
by Mellody Hobson

The subject of race can be very touchy. As finance executive Mellody Hobson says, it's a "conversational third rail." But, she says, that's exactly why we need to start talking about it. In this engaging, persuasive talk, Hobson makes the case that speaking openly about race — and particularly about diversity in hiring — makes for better businesses and a better society.

 

Tags:

Team management

Friday Books and Talks 05/23/2014

By wolfgang. 23 May 2014 19:10

Tribal Leadership
by Dave Logan, John King, Halee Fischer-Wright

Within each corporation are anywhere from a few to hundreds of separate tribes. In Tribal Leadership, Dave Logan, John King, and Halee Fischer-Wright demonstrate how these tribes develop—and show you how to assess them and lead them to maximize productivity and growth. A business management book like no other, Tribal Leadership is an essential tool to help managers and business leaders take better control of their organizations by utilizing the unique characteristics of the tribes that exist within.

 

Tribal leadership
By David Logan

David Logan talks about the five kinds of tribes that humans naturally form — in schools, workplaces, even the driver's license bureau. By understanding our shared tribal tendencies, we can help lead each other to become better individuals.

Why good leaders make you feel safe
By Simon Sinek

What makes a great leader? Management theorist Simon Sinek suggests, it’s someone who makes their employees feel secure, who draws staffers into a circle of trust. But creating trust and safety — especially in an uneven economy — means taking on big responsibility.


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Team management

Friday Books and Talks 05/16/2014

By wolfgang. 17 May 2014 12:58

Multipliers
by Liz Wiseman, Greg McKeown

Are you a genius or a genius maker? A diminisher or a multiplier? In this executive book summary, you will learn the difference between these two leadership styles, how to become a multiplier of talent and people and how multiplying can have a resoundingly positive and profitable effect on your organization.

A thought-provoking, accessible, and essential exploration of why some leaders (“Diminishers”) drain capability and intelligence from their teams, while others (“Multipliers”) amplify it to produce better results. Including a foreword by Stephen R. Covey, as well the five key disciplines that turn smart leaders into genius makers, Multipliers is a must-read for everyone from first-time managers to world leaders.

 

What it takes to be a great leader
By Roselinde Torres

There are many leadership programs available today, from 1-day workshops to corporate training programs. But chances are, these won't really help. In this clear, candid talk, Roselinde Torres describes 25 years observing truly great leaders at work, and shares the three simple but crucial questions would-be company chiefs need to ask to thrive in the future.

The key to success? Grit.
By Angela Lee Duckworth

Duckworth, the recipient of a 2013 MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant, may be most known for her work in studying the role of grit, rather than intelligence, in predicting success in students. But this talk is also a worthy reminder for leaders of the attributes they should look for in people -- perseverance, self-control and sustained interest in long-term goals -- as well as that they should work on in themselves.

 

Tags:

Team management

Friday Books and Talks 05/09/2014

By wolfgang. 9 May 2014 12:46

Mojo
by Marshall Goldsmith, Mark Reiter

Mojo comes from the moment we do something that is purposeful, powerful, and positive, and the rest of the world recognizes it. In his follow up to the New York Times bestseller What Got You Here Won’t Get You There, #1 executive coach Marshall Goldsmith lays out the ways that we can get — and keep — our professional and personal Mojo.

360 Degrees of Influence
by Harrison Monarth

The best leaders influence those who are below and above them, as well as people external to the organization, such as customers and partners. In 360 Degrees of Influence, Harrison Monarth provides advice on how to gain the trust and respect of those around you and how to expand your influence well beyond your immediate environment. Providing valuable insight into human emotion and behavior, Monarth reveals the secrets to knowing what people are thinking and feeling — maybe better than they do.

 

What makes us feel good about our work?
By Dan Ariely

What motivates us to work? Contrary to conventional wisdom, it isn't just money. But it's not exactly joy either. It seems that most of us thrive by making constant progress and feeling a sense of purpose. Behavioral economist Dan Ariely presents two eye-opening experiments that reveal our unexpected and nuanced attitudes toward meaning in our work. (Filmed at TEDxRiodelaPlata.)

Everyday leadership
By Drew Dudley

We have all changed someone’s life — usually without even realizing it. In this funny talk, Drew Dudley calls on all of us to celebrate leadership as the everyday act of improving each other’s lives. (Filmed at TEDxToronto.)

 


Tags:

Team management

Friday Books and Talks 05/02/2014

By wolfgang. 2 May 2014 17:46

Here are some of the books I enjoyed this week. 

Focus
by Daniel Goleman

In Focus, Daniel Goleman uses cutting-edge research and findings to delve into the science of attention in all its varieties. He persuasively argues that now more than ever we must learn to sharpen our focus in order to contend with and thrive in a complex world. It requires what he calls “smart practice” to improve habits, add new skills and sustain excellence. In the mental gym, the specifics of practice can make all the difference.

Compelling People
by John Neffinger, Matthew Kohut

What makes some people irresistible and others forgettable? John Neffinger and Matthew Kohut introduce us to two qualities –– strength (the root of respect) and warmth (the root of affection) –– and they detail the signals that broadcast each of these. Drawing on the latest social science and the authors’ own work,Compelling People reveals the basic framework we use to judge each other and what we can do to earn both respect and affection.

 

For parents, happiness is a very high bar
By Jennifer Senior

The parenting section of the bookstore is overwhelming — it's "a giant, candy-colored monument to our collective panic," as writer Jennifer Senior puts it. Why is parenthood filled with so much anxiety? Because the goal of modern, middle-class parents — to raise happy children — is so elusive. In this honest talk, she offers some kinder and more achievable aims.

Should you live for your résumé ... or your eulogy?
By David Brooks

Within each of us are two selves, suggests David Brooks in this meditative short talk: the self who craves success, who builds a résumé, and the self who seeks connection, community, love — the values that make for a great eulogy. (Joseph Soloveitchik has called these selves "Adam I" and "Adam II.") Brooks asks: Can we balance these two selves?


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